How to Cope When You Don't See Results from Your Working Life

By Evan Ressegger

Photo by Janelle Pol

Photo by Janelle Pol

I often find myself frustrated with my work life. Projects pile up higher and higher. I get into arguments with my co-worker. Then I begin to wake up in the morning discouraged before the day even starts.

Many times I have found myself exhausted at the end of a work week. Have you? Suddenly, I find myself avoiding my friends on Saturdays, preferring being home alone to hanging out.

Whenever my work life starts to affect the rest of my life, it’s then I need to remember what God says about me, and my life here on earth.

But you are God’s chosen treasure...He called you out of darkness to experience his marvelous light...broadcast his glorious wonders throughout the world.

1. SEE YOURSELF THROUGH GOD’S EYES

God has chosen you and me to be his treasure.

The go-getting culture of NYC constantly tells me to do better in my work in order to shine and feel that I have value. But the truth is that I am, above all, a daughter of God made to declare his light.

If I reflect on how much God values me, I realize there is nothing I must do to prove my worth.

Although work can make us feel significant (or possibly insignificant), there is nothing we need to do to demonstrate our value when we see ourselves through God’s eyes.

2. SEE EVERYTHING AS BEING PRODUCTIVE

God promises when we view life as working alongside him, no work is in vain.

With God, we do not need to worry about what may seem like a chaotic work week. We can rest assured we are not working alone, but have a friend — God — who has our best interests at heart. He ensures our work is productive, even when it feels like it isn’t.

3. SEE YOURSELF AS HAVING A HIGHER CALLING

Feeling “less than” at work does not mean you are less significant as a person. With God we are enough, and when we work alongside him, our work gains more meaning.

No matter what may be going on in our work situations, as God’s daughters who are here to reflect his “glorious wonders,” our work is much bigger than we can understand.

How would your view of work change if you considered yourself working alongside God?